Program Analyze Evidence

Twig Science builds progressive and logical use of the three dimensions. Explicit connections to the dimensions across grades, within grades, and within modules help students and teachers to connect prior learning, current learning, and future learning. The assessment framework provides data to monitor student progress toward the required grade-level proficiency. The rubric provides evidence of these strengths.

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Evaluation Rubrics

Twig Science scores highly on NGSS-based rubrics such as NextGen TIME Paper screen evaluation. See below for materials that show exactly how we meet these criteria:

Foundations

Student Work

Student Progress

Teacher Support

Program

It shows how each module targets a bundle of PEs from different disciplines, including engineering.. This interdisciplinary approach to learning, supports students to make connections between Life, Physical, Earth and Space Science, and Engineering, and reflects how scientists and engineers work in the real world, as opposed to working in a single discipline.

 

The Performance Expectation Progressions table , included in the K–6 NGSS Alignment and Progression Guide and in the relevant Teacher Edition (back cover), are module specific. They tell the story of how students have used, and will use, the module-relevant three dimensions with increasing complexity across the program. For example, the Performance Expectation Progressions table for Grade 3 Module 1 identifies that, before this module, students have investigated:

 

● Push and pull forces in Kindergarten Module 2 (Marble Run Engineers), covering K-PS2-1, and K-PS2-2.

● Engineering tasks in Grade 1 Module 3 (Shadow Town), covering SEP-3.

● Practices in Grade 2 Module 2 (Master of Materials), covering K–2-ETS1-1, K–2-ETS1-2, K–2-ETS1-3. In later grades, students will encounter:

● The relationship between energy and forces when objects collide in Grade 4 Module 4 (PS3.C).

● Planning and carrying out fair tests where variables are controlled in Grade 5 Module 1 (3–5-ETS1-1).

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Grade 4 Module 4 Performance Expectation Progressions table

Progression Across the Grade

K–6 NGSS Alignment and Progression Guide includes the Scope and Sequence tables for K–6. A grade-specific Scope and Sequence is included in the front cover of each Teacher Edition.

 

The Scope and Sequence tables clearly identify the sequence of the modules in every grade, as well as the Module Phenomenon or Investigative Problem the students are figuring out, and the storyline, which puts the learning journey into a captivating context. The PEs that each module addresses are also identified, as are the sequence of the three dimensions that are addressed over the course of the grade.

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Progression Across a Module

 

In every module, students follow a sequence of Driving Questions (DQs) designed to progressively build their skills and scientifically accurate understandings. The flow of SEPs, CCCs, and DCIs across the DQs follow a logical sequence supporting students to gain expertise of the practices and concepts they need to address the Module Phenomenon/ Investigative Problem.

 

The Module Contents in every Teacher Edition provides an overview of the module conceptual flow and details the sequence of the PEs addressed.

 

For example, in Grade 4 Module 4 the Module Investigative Problem is: How can we reduce the damage caused by earthquakes?

 

Students tackle the problem in stages, by following a sequence of six DQs:

 

● DQ1: How are waves involved in earthquakes?

● DQ2: How can patterns help us predict where earthquakes and volcanoes will occur?

● DQ3: How can building materials and shapes affect the severity of earthquake damage?

● DQ4: How can our understanding of earthquakes and materials help us build safer buildings?

● DQ5: What can we learn from engineers that will help us revise our designs?

● DQ6: How can we redesign our buildings to make them safer during earthquakes?

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Grade 4 Module 4 Module Contents

Flow of DCIs

 

● DQ1: Students explore natural hazards (PS4-1), properties of waves (ESS3.B), and define and develop engineering engineering solutions (ETS1.A and ETS1.B).

● DQ2: Students investigate plate tectonics (ESS2.B).

● DQ3: Students define, develop, and optimize engineering solutions (ETS1.A, ETS1.B, and ETS1.C).

● DQ4: Students build on the engineering DCIs (ETS1.A, ETS1.B, and ETS1.C) and revisit natural hazards (ESS3.B).

● DQ5: Students revisit natural hazards (ESS3.B) and design solutions (ETS1.B).

● DQ6: Students revisit natural hazards (ESS3.B) and define, develop, and optimize engineering solutions(ETS1.A, ETS1.B, and ETS1.C).

 

Flow of SEPs and CCCs

● DQ1: Students ask questions and define problems (SEP-1), use models (SEP-2), and apply the concept of patterns (CCC 1).

● DQ2: Students analyze data (SEP-4) and use patterns (CCC-1).

● DQ3: Students ask questions and define problems (SEP-1), construct explanations and design solutions (SEP-6), analyze and interpret data (SEP-4), and explore the influence of science, technology and engineering on society and the natural worlds.

● DQ4: students gain further experience of asking questions and defining problems, constructing explanations and designing solutions, analyzing and interpreting data (SEPs1 and 6)), apply the concept of cause and effect and exploring the influence of science, technology and engineering on society and the natural worlds (CCC 2).

● DQ5: Students construct explanations and designing solutions (SEP-6), apply the concept of cause and effect (CCC-2), and explore the influence of science, technology and engineering on society and the natural worlds.

● DQ6: Students consolidate asking questions and defining problems (SEP-1), constructing explanations and designing solutions (SEP-6), analyzing and interpreting data (SEP-4), applying cause and effect (CCC-2), and exploring the influence of science, technology and engineering on society and the natural worlds.

● By the end of DQ6, students have figured out the answer to the Module Investigative Problem. They understand that earthquake damage can be reduced by not building on active fault lines, where possible, and/or by using a variety engineering solutions that allow buildings to withstand the shaking caused by the energy of seismic waves.

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Progression Across a Driving Question

 

More detail on how the sequence of ideas and practices flow across each DQ is provided in every Driving Question Overview which provides a short summary of the three dimensional activities in each lesson.

 

For example, in Grade 4 Module 4:

 

In DQ1, students explore the question: How are waves involved in earthquakes? Over five lessons, students are first introduced to the phenomena of natural hazards (ESS3.B), before carrying out investigations—both physical and digital—to model waves (SEP-2), and understand the properties of waves and how they transfer energy (PS4.A). They interrogate texts, watch videos, and apply the Crosscutting Concepts of cause and effect (CCC-2) and energy and matter (CCC-5) to figure out the answer to the DQ—seismic waves cause earthquakes, and larger waves, which transfer more energy, cause earthquakes of greater magnitude and the potential to cause more destruction.

 

Progression Across a Lesson

 

The five-part Twig Science lesson structure has been designed to support students to develop their metacognitive abilities on a daily basis:

 

Spark: An engaging “hook” activity, which motivates students for the investigations ahead.

Investigate: Students think like scientists and design like engineers, through hands-on, digital, video, and informational text Investigations.

Report: Students articulate what they’ve learned today, citing evidence and their use of the three dimensions.

Connect: Students make connections to the DQs and Module Phenomenon/Investigative Problem, while building knowledge of CCCs and SEPs.

Reflect: Students use different means to think about what they have learned so far and how they can use their new understandings to better figure out phenomena/problems.

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Driving Question Overview

Each Lesson Overview includes the lesson’s targeted standards, the 3-D Learning Objectives, and the sequence of learning, which is displayed in a simple graphic organizer with a suggested pacing guide to help teachers plan. For example, in Grade 4 Module 4 (Grade 4 Module 4 DQ2L1 Overview TE p. 48), students will:

 

Investigate patterns in the locations of earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain ranges using an interactive map.

Report their observations and discuss these with the class.

Connect what they have learned to the PE 4-ESS2-2.

Reflect on how knowing where earthquakes occur will help them answer the Module Investigative Problem.

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Grade 4 Module 4 DQ2L1 Overview TE p. 48

Students use the SEPs with increasing grade-level appropriate complexity over the course of the program. The progression for how students apply the SEPs in Twig Science directly aligns with the California NGSS Framework expectations for grade bands K–2, 3–5, and 6–8. Details of the progression for how SEPs are applied are found in the digital Guide to SEPs and CCCs. This guide contains a short summary of each SEP and why it’s important. The progression of the SEPs through each grade band is discussed, with grade-specific contextual examples.

 

For example, pages 17–22 detail (with specific contextual examples) how students use Planning and Carrying Out Investigations (SEP-3 ) with increasingly complexity across the program. In addition to supporting teachers in the implementation of the SEPs, the digital guide provides some top tips for improving teaching of each SEP.

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Guide to SEPs and CCCs

Students use the CCCs with increasing grade-level appropriate complexity over the course of the program. The progression for how students apply the CCCs in Twig Science directly aligns with the California NGSS Framework expectations for grade bands K–2, 3–5, and 6–8. Details of the progression for how CCCs are applied are found in the digital Guide to SEPs and CCCs. This guide contains a short summary of each CCC and why it’s important. The progression of the CCCs through each grade band is discussed, with grade-specific contextual examples.

 

For example, pages 79–83 detail (with specific contextual examples) how students use Stability and Change (CCC-7) with increasingly complexity across the program. In addition to supporting teachers in the implementation of the CCCs, the digital guide provides some top tips for improving teaching of each CCC.

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Guide to SEPs and CCCs

Twig Science has been developed to directly align to the CA NGSS Framework, and spiral students’ progression at understanding the DCIs, as mapped out in the Framework. The progression of the DCIs across the Twig Science Program is shown clearly at a program level in the CA NGSS Framework Alignment table, at a grade level in the Grade Scope and Sequence, and at a module level in the Module Contents and Lesson Overviews.

 

To drive student engagement and motivation for exploring the DCIs, every module has a storyline that puts the science content and phenomena and problems in authentic, grade-relevant contexts. These storylines are presented to the students at the start of each module through a movie-style Trailer video. For example, students in Grade 1 explore Electromagnetic Radiation (PS4.B) and the phenomena of light, reflection, and shadows to figure out a solution for a town in Norway that experiences darkness for 6 months of the year—the so-called Shadow Town. Students in Grade 6 Module 3 explore the DCIs of Inheritance and Variation of Traits (LS3.A and LS3.B) and Growth and Development of Organisms (LS1.B), and explore the phenomena of extinct species in The Red List, where they have to develop a conservation plan for an endangered species of their choice.

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Module Contents
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Lesson Overview

The K–6 NGSS Alignment and Progression Guide shows where ETS is fully integrated into each module and how it progresses across the K–6 program, rather than being an add on. The engineering design process, the skills of defining problems and designing solutions, and connections to the NoS are logically and imaginatively woven into the science and narrative storyline of each module.

 

For example, in Grade 1 Module 1:

● Students create a plant museum using SEPs, CCCs, DCIs, ETS and NoS to figure out the Module Phenomenon: How are all plants alike and how are they different? Through a series of hands-on and data investigations, and nature explorations (outdoors and growing plants from seed in the classroom), students gain understanding of the different plant parts, as well as their shapes and functions. At the same time, students develop valuable skills in making observations and comparisons, and identifying patterns.

● Students investigate what plants need and how a plant’s parts help it to grow and survive. They go on to explore the many methods that plants use to distribute seeds away from the parent plant. Students work in teams to tackle their first Engineering Design Challenge: to design and build seeds for dispersal by the wind. They test and present the results of their design, before adding a Seeds Room to the Museum of Leafology.

● Students then observe the seedlings they planted, as well as plants in nature, and record similarities and differences. They also investigate the clever strategies plants use to get what they need, including the defences that some plants use. After observing and discussing existing inventions that were inspired by plants, students tackle their second Engineering Design Challenge: to design, build, and present their own plant-inspired solution to a human problem.

● At the end of the module, students invite other classes and their own families to visit the museum, in order to demonstrate their learning. This is followed by a celebratory plant parts salad—using plants that they grew themselves!

 

Likewise, in Grade 4 Module 4, students integrate the use of ETS and NoS to solve the Module Investigative Problem: How can we reduce the damage caused by earthquakes?

● Students start by modeling the phenomena of waves and gain understanding of how waves are involved in earthquakes.

● Then, using an interactive map, students make sense of why earthquakes appear in patterns along plate boundaries, and how those patterns help earthquake engineers plan how and where to build. Students are assessed on their ability to analyze data in maps, identify the Earth's features, and identify patterns where earthquakes occur.

● Through a series of investigations, students build understanding of how the shape, structure, and properties of materials affect a building’s ability to withstand forces. They apply this knowledge to the engineering design process to design, build, and test their first earthquake-resistant structures. Students continue to make observations and obtain information from physical models, informational texts, and videos that showcase real-world engineering solutions that inform their design revisions.

● In the final presentation of their engineering designs, students explain how decisions about building characteristics, such as materials’ flexibility, shape, and symmetry, address the Module Investigative Problem. Students are assessed on their ability to evaluate multiple design solutions for make buildings more earthquake-resistant, and ensuring the solutions meet the design criteria and constraints.

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Throughout all module teachers are prompted to raise visibility of the use of ETS and NoS. For example, in Grade 4 Module 4 (G4M4DQ1L3 Connect TE p.26), support is given to connect the learning activity to ETS.

 

Twig Science integrates stunning videos as part of its instructional design. These video bring ETS and NoS to life for students, having them make the connection to what they are learning in the real world. They also prive a wide range of positive role models for scientists and engineers working across a range of fields.

 

In Grade 4 Module 4, the LAX Engineer video (DQ4L2) relates earthquake engineering to a real world California example, while the Edison video (DQ4L4) gives context to the idea that failure can be a positive learning experience. Failure and persistence in finding a solution is also portrayed in positive light in Grade 1 Module 2, when students watch the Trial and Error–Lion Lights video and meet the young engineer Richard Turere who solved the problem of lions eating his village's livestock.

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Grade 4 Module 4 DQ1L3 Connect TE p.26.

In addition, every module is complemented with a magazine-style leveled reader (available in four levels, plus Spanish) that provides additional exposure to relevant phenomena/problems, as well as interviews with scientists and engineers from diverse backgrounds. Packed with stunning images, cartoons, and jokes, they are designed to appeal to students from a diverse range of learning abilities.

 

Chapter 1 often takes a look at the historical accumulation of knowledge that led has led to our present understanding of the module phenomena.

Chapter 2 features interviews with many positive role models in the field of science and engineering, and is designed to cultivate interest in STEM careers for all students.

Chapter 3 always connects the ideas explored in the reader's back to a context that is relevant for the students, again help them make the connection to NoS.

 

For example, the Leveled Reader for Grade 4 Module 4, Shake, Rattle, explores what different cultures used to think caused earthquakes, features an interview with a young female volcanologist, and investigates the cost of earthquake proofing our cities.

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Shake, Rattle, and Roll (Grade 4 Module 4 Leveled Reader)

The K–6 NGSS Alignment table clearly identifies where each PE is addressed in each grade. The Module Contents clearly identifies where and how each PE is addressed in each module. The Module Assessment Overview clearly identifies where and how the PEs are assessed in each module. For example, the Grade 3 Module 1 Assessment Overview.

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Evidence

Progression Across the Program

The Twig Science Program Guide (provided online and at the front of every Teacher Edition) outlines the instructional design of the program and how all the components work together to support students to use the three dimensions to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

 

The K–6 NGSS Alignment and Progression Guide details how the three dimensions build logically and progressively over the program.

 

The CA NGSS Framework Alignment (front cover of every Teacher Edition) sets out the logical sequence for the Performance Expectations (PEs) across the Twig Science K–6 modules, and shows where they are addressed in each grade. It illustrates how the 29 K–6 modules align directly to the 29 K–6 CA Framework Segments.

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CA NGSS Framework Alignment

The Twig Science Scope and Sequences , available in the K–6 NGSS Alignment and Progression Guide, and in the front cover of each Teacher Edition, show the sequence of SEPs, CCCs, and DCIs that the students use across the grade. They make it clear to see where new dimensions are introduced and where they are revisited.

 

For example, in Grade 4:

● Module 1: Students explore what happens to energy when objects collide.

● Module 2: Students revisit the concept of energy, and investigate energy sources and the energy needs of the United States.

● Module 4: Students investigate the phenomena of waves and how earthquakes transfer energy to the ground as waves.

● Module 5: Students build on their knowledge of waves and energy transfers, and solve the engineering design problem of building a long-distance communication device.

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Grade 4 Scope and Sequence

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At the start of each grade, the class creates its own Science Tools poster. It starts off as a blank piece of paper, and the class gradually adds the SEPs that they use to make sense of phenomena and and solve problems. They also refer back to it when they revisit a SEP. By the time the class has completed the last module in the grade, students will have used the SEPs explicitly many times. This metacognitive activity helps students to build a growing awareness of their use and mastery of these practices. It also helps them make explicit connections to their prior and future learning. For example:

● In Grade 3 Module 1, students revisit “Design solutions” (SEP-6), and add “Make models,” “Use models” (SEP-2), “Plan investigations” (SEP-3), and “Define problems” (SEP-1) to their poster.

● In Grade 4 Module 4, students revisit “Develop and use models” (SEP-2), and add “Evaluate information” (SEP-8), “Analyze and interpret data” (SEP-4), and “Define problems”(SEP-1) to their poster. In DQ2L3 Connect TE p. 70, students further add “Analyze data” to their Science Tools Poster.

 

Teachers are prompted when to add a SEP to the Science Tools Poster, and are reminded of the context for when the students previously used a SEP and where they will go on to use the SEP. For example, Grade 4 Module DQ2L4 Connect TE p. 78, the teacher is prompted to add “Define problems” to their poster and to let students know that, in future lessons, they will both define and solve problems.

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Grade 4 Module 4 DQ2L2 TE p.62

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As students take notes in their Twig Book, they are supported to make explicit connections to the relevant SEPs, which are labeled in blue text before the student question/prompt.

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Grade 3 Module 1 DQ1L3 TB p. 21

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Grade 3 Module 1 DQ1L4 TB p. 22

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Teachers using Twig Science are supported at the point of use in each lesson to raise the visibility of student thinking, making the connection for where their prior knowledge and growing mastery of the three dimensions across all disciplines (both within the module and in previous modules and grades) is helping them to make sense of the module phenomena and problems. This point of connection is often made in the Connect section of the lesson.

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ5L4 Connect p. 183

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For example, in Grade 5 Module 2:

 

● Throughout the module students are consistently supported to revise their claims and relate their new understandings to answering the DQs and solving the Module Phenomenon (How do matter and energy move through an ecosystem?)

● Students engage with a Prior-Knowledge Read-Aloud about animals, plants, and matter (DQ1L1 TE p. 8).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ1L1 Spark TE p. 8

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Students observe a series of slides from Yellowstone, activating their prior knowledge of the national park, its features, and some of the organisms that live there (DQ1L1 TE p. 9).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ1L1 Investigation TE p. 9

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Students are prompted to think back of their use of Scale, Proportion, and Quantity (CCC-3) in Grade 5 Module 1, where they investigated where plants get their matter from (DQ1L2 TE p. 19).

 

Students review all the evidence they have gathered throughout the DQ2 and use it to construct scientific explanations (DQ2L6 TE p. 78, TB pp. 35–36).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ2L6 Investigation TE p. 78

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ2L6 TB pp. 35–36

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Students are reminded of when they used Cause and Effect (CCC-2) in Grade 5 Module 1 while investigating what happens when certain substances are mixed. Students review the science tools they’ve used and add “Ask questions” to the Science Tools poster (DQ3L1 TE p. 97).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ3L1 Connect TE p. 97

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Students complete a diagnostic pre-assessment (Pre-Exploration) to elicit awareness of their prior knowledge and misconceptions of dead matter and decomposition (DQ4L4 TB p. 88).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ4L4 TB p. 88

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Following a collaborative language routine, students revise their explanations about how matter moves through an ecosystem (DQ5L4 TE p. 182/TB p. 110).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ5L4 Investigate TE p. 182

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ5L4 TB p. 110

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Students reflect on their new understandings and ideas about ecosystems, comparing and contrasting the Yellowstone ecosystem with other ecosystems they’ve studied in science class (DQ6L2 TE p. 208/TB p. 132).

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ6L2 Reflect TE p. 208

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Grade 5 Module 2 DQ6L2 TB p. 132

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Evidence

The K–6 NGSS Alignment and Progression Guide shows the sequence of DCIs, CCCs, and SEPs that the students use across the program and how they spiral in complexity.

 

For example, Kindergarten Module 1 uses the three dimensions to explore the phenomenon of different plants and animals living in different place. Students investigate how living things get the things they to survive from their environments. That concept is also explored in greater depth in Grade 2 Module 4, where students use the dimensions with more sophistication to make sense of the phenomenon of the interdependence of living things in an environment. Later, in Grade 5 Module 2, students use the three dimensions to explore food webs and the phenomenon of energy and matter moving through an ecosystem. Finally, in Grade 6 Module 3, students use their growing mastery of the three dimensions to further expand their exploration of these concepts when investigating how the environment and genetics can affect living things.

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Kindergarten Module 1 Performance Expectation Progressions table

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Progressions of Learning

Unit-to-unit Coherence

Additional Pre-Explorations are integrated at strategic points throughout the module where they add most value. For example, in Grade 4 Module 4, students complete a Pre-Exploration in DQ1L1 Reflect TB p. 19 and DQ3L1 Reflect TE p. 103.

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Grade 4 Module 4 DQ1L1 Reflect TB p. 9

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Grade 4 Module 4 DQ3L1 Reflect TE p. 103

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Formative Assessments (Informal Assessment)

 

Ongoing Formative Assessments, sometimes referred to as Informal Assessments, are woven into each lesson. These are quick ways to gauge student understanding, allowing teachers to tailor their instruction accordingly. They include a wide variety of formats with clear expectations that allow students to demonstrate their understanding of the learning goals in multiple ways. They include class discussions, constructed responses (written and drawn), self and peer assessment, and teacher observations.

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Formative Assessments

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Summative Assessments

 

Summative Performance Tasks are rich and highly engaging activities designed to motivate students to demonstrate their mastery of the expected grade-level proficiency for the PEs. Leveled rubrics are provided from Grade 2 onwards to support teachers to grade attainment level of students of all abilities (Emerging, Developing, Proficient, and Advanced), and student versions of the rubrics give students a clear understanding of what success looks like.

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Grade 6 Module 3 DQ5 Benchmark Assessment Teacher Rubric TE p. 176

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Grade 6 Module 3 DQ5 Benchmark Assessment Standards

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Modules in Grades 3–6 include SCALE Benchmark Assessments, which assess students’ ability to apply the knowledge and skills gained throughout the module to new contexts. This gives students exposure to the types of assessment items they will face in the state test. Leveled rubrics support easy grading with sample student answers provided in the form of “Look Fors.” Student versions of these rubrics are available without the “Look Fors.”

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Grade 6 Module 3 DQ5 Benchmark Assessment Teacher Rubric TE p. 176

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Grades 3–6 also include 3-D Multiple Choice Assessments, which quickly assess student understanding of a range of dimensions covered in the module. An extended section (Part C) has been designed to stretch GATE students.

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Grade 6 Module 3 Multiple Choice Assessment Grading DOK and Standards

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Grade 6 Module 3 Multiple Choice Assessment Answer Guide

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The assessment items in the Pre-explorations, Performance Tasks, Benchmark Assessments, and Multiple Choice Assessments are tied to specific dimensions and/or PEs. The data generated by this system of assessments can then provide a picture of student and class progression across a module, grade, or, over time, the full K–6 program.

 

Teachers have the choice to administer the assessments digitally or in print. Student data is generated automatically if administered digitally, but teachers can still input scores manually if they prefer students to take the printed assessment.

 

As students revisit the dimensions and PEs several times across a grade, the Twig Science Assessment System can provide a picture of student progressions across the module and grade. It will be clear which students are tracking at the expected grade level (Proficient), which need extra support (Emerging and Developing), and which are performing at an advanced level (Advanced).

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Twig Science Assessment System

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Grade Level

 

The K–6 NGSS Alignment table details the conceptual flow of student learning across Twig Science. It’s clear to see where each of the NGSS PEs are addressed. The grade-level Assessment Overview provides details on where each PEs is assessed, along with details of how outcomes can be measured.

 

Module Level

 

A more detailed map of the assessment opportunities (both formal and informal) of all dimensions in each module are provided in the Module Assessment Overviews. All assessments in Twig Science are tied to specific learning goals, with tools provided for how to measure student success.

 

● Student performance at the Pre-Explorations is measured using the Progress Tracker . Formative Assessments (Informal Assessments) are measured using a variety of means. This could be a show of hands, a class discussion, or student answers in their Twig Books. A version of the Twig Book with sample answers is provided to support teachers to know what success looks like. Reduxes of the student answers are also included at point of use in the Teacher Editions.

● Student performance at the PEs are assessed in the Summative Performance Tasks and Benchmark Assessments are measured using rubrics.

● Multiple Choice Assessments are machine-scored or by using answer grids if administered in print.

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Progress Tracker

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Evidence

The Twig Science Assessment System has been developed in partnership with Stanford University’s SCALE team. It is designed to provide a three-dimensional assessment system that allows teachers to evaluate student attainment of the three dimensions and PEs of the NGSS.

 

The assessment strategies measure students’ knowledge and ability. They favor Performance Tasks over rote memorization and include a rich variety of measures, such as written assignments, collaborative engineering design challenges, and oral presentations. There are also lots of informal ways to quickly evaluate student progress.

 

Pre-Explorations (Diagnostic Pre-Assessment)

 

Near the start of each module, students complete a Pre-Exploration (Diagnostic Pre-Assessment). Pre-Explorations enable teachers to identify student prior knowledge of the three dimensions as well as any misconceptions students may hold.

 

Progress Trackers are provided to support teachers as they track how students address their misconceptions and demonstrate their growing mastery of the three dimensions and PEs targeted in each module. Guidance is also given in the Teacher Edition for how to tailor instruction for students whose misconceptions persist, or who need extra scaffold to reach the required grade proficiency of the standards.

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Pre-Explorations

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Program Assessment System